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20130121
20130129
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recent elections in the middle east, one in jordan and one in israel. we talk with jordan's ambassador to the united nations prince bin ra'ad and efraim halevy. >> when we first heard the rumblings of the arab spring some may have thought that thises with a train that was passing through the station in and out. i think his majesty understood full well that these were seismic rumblings. and the region has had for a long time been bereft of real refos. his majesty began earlier on. and i think you know now felt that for those who had a vested interest in the stat usco, this is their time to understand-- status quo, this is their time to understand something is changing. >> there is something much more deep that going to happen in the months to am come and there have before been a few indications of this in the last 48 hoursment and that is that the problem of the relationship between religion and state between those who are orthox and traworthodox an thoho are to a large extent secular, how to create a society in which you have common aims, common beliefs, and which people enjoy common r
on the dupont. >> thank you so much. >> rose: we turn now to politics and elections in israel and jordan earlier this week. this comes at a time when the winds of change are sweeping through the middle east. since the start of the arab spring political unrest in jordan has intensified. many groups including the muslim brotherhood boy kod the election with more than half of jordan's registered voters participated. this is part of a series of reforms king abdullah ii has implemented to combat political discents. if israel benjamin netanyahu was granted aid third term as a prime minister in the coalition government but the real winner maybe lapid worst centrist party gain gained substantial ground, joining me is jordan ambassador to the united nation and efraim halevy who served in the israel national security council. i'm pleased to have them both on this program to talk together at this table about important things that are going on in their region including elections, mr. ambassador, thank you for coming. tell me what we read into the jordanian elections and what they tell us about the f
pushed back hard. >> rose: we conclude this evening with the a look at the surprising elections in israel with david remnick, mort zuckerman, and dennis ross. >> i don't want us to be deluded and think because lapid somehow got an outsized amount of votes suddenly the country has moved dramatically to the left. it has not. it has not. and i think we need to have a more tragic sense of what's going on in terms of the palestinian question, which is the one that concerns us the most. certainly it is in the top three of the big questions about israel. and there's not going to be dramatic movement on that at all. >> rose: what happened in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans were killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton's testimon
in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans were killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton's testimony had been post toned until now. she took responsibility and emsized her commitment to improving diplomat security abroad. >> as i have mentioned many times i take responsibility and nobody is more committed to getting this right. i am determined to leave the state department and our country safer, stronger, and more secure. now, taking responsibility meant moving quickly in those first uncertain hours and days to respond to the immediate crisis, but, also, to further protect our people and posts in high-threat areas across the region and the world. it meant launching an independent investigation to determine exactly what happened in b
of the world in this election in whh he did well with minorities and younger voters and so to the extent that his second election ratified the new obama coalition and the new shape of the electorate he so too hopes his second term will speak to that. >> rose: we conclude this evening with part one of a two-part conversation about the presidency of barack obama and the next four years joined by doris kearns goodwin, jon meacham, bob woodward, bob caro, and michael beschloss. >> i know it's the consensus that we're -- barack obama has to do is get along with the republicans. i'd like to say something about that. president obama is fond of quoting-- and if he isn't, i am-- martin luther king's statement "the moral arc of the universe bends slowly but it bends towards justice." in the first term, president obama did bend that moral arc. he got health insurance, peace of mind for more than 30 million people. the bill may be floored but it's passed. in the second term i see a sort of differently. everyone's attacking the moral arc of justice-- social security medicare everyone's saying we have
of the world in this election in which he did well with minorities and younger voters so to the extent that his second election ratified the new obama coalition and the new shape of the electorate he so, too, hopes his second term will speak to that. and i think that was an interesting part of this speech but if you're in a republican hearing this when he talks about collective action they hear big government, when he talks about investment they hear taxes and when he talks about takers which he did in the speech, that's a loaded word. it aims right at paul ryan who talked about takers versus makers, the takers being the one who receive federal benefits but pay no federal income tax. that's a shot. that's not just language that's slipped in. so that's the sense in which this had a combative -- there were a few barbs in this speech. >> one of the moments in the campaign when the president was office balance was when he said you didn't build it, talking about small business. that was one of the big themes of the speech saying you need collective action in order to get anything done. again, not ne
goodwin. >> i think, i'll take all three of them. >> rose: i know you will. >> the re-election really sert fies the legacy. think if he wasn't elected. maybe obamacare would have been undone in congress. abortion rights might have gone backwards. now we are sure they will not under his administration. con tra ception will be out there. the sense that the country can move in the direction that he was trying to move it which goes back to what we've been saying all along that collective action can produce individual help. might have been shifted in the other direction had he not won. so everything he accomplished i think is multiplied by the fact that he won that reelection. it's human. bigger than it seemed at the time. >> rose: in fact, he has said, in the last several mths that this victory was as much, was as important not more important because in fact it was a referendum on what he had done before in the first four year. >> absolutely. >> rose: okay bob i leave it to you to sort of sum up the first term. >> first of all i think the real questions are what has he learned and how h
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)